HCI Joint Talk: Dan Vogel (U. Waterloo) & Per Ola Kristensson (U. Cambridge) – Københavns Universitet

HCI Joint Talk: Dan Vogel (U. Waterloo) & Per Ola Kristensson (U. Cambridge)

We are happy to welcome two of the world’s most imaginative HCI researchers to DIKU, Dan Vogel  (U. Waterloo, Canada) and Per Ola Kristensson (U. Cambridge). Their talks are entitled “Subtle Interaction for Increased Expressivity” and “The surprisingly narrow design space of interaction techniques: a case for information engineering blended with behavioural design”.

Daniel Vogel on 'Subtle Interaction for Increased Expressivity'

Abstract

Many interaction techniques focus on immediate usability with little learning effort. This is a reasonable goal in many cases, but sometimes expending effort to master a more nuanced and complex technique can be beneficial if it increases expressivity. Expressivity refers to the breadth of what can be represented and communicated in an interaction language – the more expressive, the greater the variety and quantity of commands that can be accessed. As a musical analogy, consider the expressivity of a kazoo versus a violin. In this talk, I will survey my research focusing on expressive interaction. This includes: Conté, a pen-like input device modeled after an artist’s crayon that leverages small changes in contact geometry; Pin-and-Cross, a touch overloading technique combining static touches (“pins”) with nearby crossing selection; and Gunslinger, a mid-air interaction technique using barehand postures and gestures performed in a relaxed arms-down position.

Bio

Daniel Vogel is an Assistant Professor at the Cheriton School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo. His research interests are in Human-Computer Interaction, focusing on fundamental characteristics and novel forms of input and interaction. In addition to earning a PhD and MSc from the University of Toronto, he holds a BFA from the Emily Carr University of Art + Design, and continues to exhibit artwork and apply his combined art and science background to research. Vogel has received multiple honours including: two best papers (2010, 2007) and two best paper nominations (2008, 2014) at the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI) conference; the Bill Buxton Dissertation Award for best Canadian doctoral dissertation in Human-Computer Interaction (2010); and a prestigious Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship (2011).

Per Ola Kristensson on 'The surprisingly narrow design space of interaction techniques: a case for information engineering blended with behavioural design'

Abstract

Throughout the years we have been blessed with ever more efficient computing systems. However, the interaction techniques that allow us to tap into all this power have not always kept pace. In this talk I will argue that the reason for this is the perhaps surprisingly narrow design space that forms the envelope of design of feasible interaction techniques that users are willing to adopt. As a potential way forward I will demonstrate how information engineering blended with behavioural design can potential overcome this challenge.

Bio

Per Ola Kristensson is a University Lecturer in the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge. He is interested in designing intelligent interactive systems that enable people to be more creative, expressive and satisfied in their daily lives. His PhD thesis was on gesture keyboard technology for touchscreens and in 2007 he co-founded ShapeWriter, Inc. to commercialise this technology. He was the Director of Engineering of this company until it was acquired by Nuance Communications in 2010. ShapeWriter was selected as the 8th best iPhone application by Time magazine in 2008 and won a Google Android ADC50 developer award in the same year. He did his doctoral work at the Institute of Technology at Linköping University, Sweden and at IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California, USA (Ph.D. Computer Science 2007). In 2008-2011 he was a Junior Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge (Darwin College) and in 2011-2014 he was a Lecturer at the University of St Andrews. He is an Honorary Associate Professor (Docent) in Computer and Systems Science at Stockholm University, Sweden and an Honorary Reader at the University of St Andrews. In 2013 he was recognised as an Innovator Under 35 (TR35) by MIT Technology Review and appointed a Member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Young Academy of Scotland. In 2014 he won the ACM User Interface Software and Technology (UIST) Lasting Impact Award and the Royal Society of Edinburgh Early Career Prize in Physical Sciences, the Sir Thomas Makdougall Brisbane Medal. He is an Associate Editor of ACM Transactions on Intelligent Interactive Systems and the International Journal of Human-Computer Studies.